LIQUEURS

A liqueur is an alcoholic beverage made from a distilled spirit that has been flavoured with fruit, cream, herbs, spices or nuts, and bottled with added sugar or other sweetener (such as high-fructose corn syrup. Liqueurs are typically quite sweet; they are usually not aged for long after the ingredients are mixed, but may have resting periods during their production to allow flavours to marry. Some liqueurs contain digestive properties and are ideal for having with coffee after a meal.



Pimms


ALC/VOL = 25% Alcohol
Pimm's is a brand of fruit cups, but may also be considered a liqueur. It was first produced in 1823 by James Pimm.  Pimm, a farmer's son from Kent became the owner of an oyster bar in the City of London, near the Bank of England. He offered the tonic (a gin-based drink containing a secret mixture of herbs and liqueurs) as an aid to digestion, serving it in a small tankard known as a "Pimms No. 1 Cup", hence its subsequent name. Pimm's began large-scale production in 1851 to keep up with sales to other bars. The distillery began selling it commercially in 1859 using hawkers on bicycles. In 1865, Pimm sold the business and the right to use his name to Frederick Sawyer. In 1880, the business was acquired by future Lord Mayor of London Horatio Davies, and a chain of Pimm's Oyster Houses was franchised in 1887.

Over the years, Pimm's extended their range, using other spirits as bases for new "cups". In 1851, Pimm's No. 2 Cup ( Scotch Whisky) and Pimm's No. 3 Cup (Brandy) were introduced. After World War II, Pimm's No. 4 Cup  (Jamaican Rum) was invented, followed by Pimm's No. 5 Cup (Rye Whisky) and Pimm's No. 6 Cup (Vodka) in the 1960s.

The brand fell on hard times in the 1970s and 1980s. The Oyster House chain was sold and Pimm's Cup products Nos. 2 to 5 were phased out due to reduced demand in 1970 after new owners The Distillers Company had taken control.

Pimms is now enjoyed at most regal occasions, and in particular, Wimbledon and Royal Ascot. Generally topped up with lemonade but some people prefer ginger ale, however it also tastes superb by mixing half lemonade and half ginger ale. 

 

Suntory Liqueurs 


ALC/VOL = 21% - 40% Alcohol
Curaçao is a liqueur flavoured with the dried peel of the laraha citrus fruit, grown on the island of Curaçao. A non-native plant similar to an orange, the laraha developed from the sweet Valencia orange transplanted by Spanish explorers. The nutrient-poor soil and arid climate of Curaçao proved unsuitable to Valencia cultivation, resulting in small, bitter fruit of the trees. Although the bitter flesh of the Laraha is all but inedible, the peels are aromatic and flavourful, maintaining much of the essence of the Valencia orange.

Curaçao liqueur was first developed and marketed by the Senior family in the 19th century. To create the liqueur the laraha peel is dried, bringing out the sweetly fragranced oils. After soaking in a still with alcohol and water for several days, the peel is removed and other spices are added.

The liqueur has an orange-like flavour with varying degrees of bitterness. It is naturally colourless, but is often given artificial colouring, most commonly blue or orange, which confers an exotic appearance to cocktails and other mixed drinks. Blue colour is achieved by adding of food colorant, most often E133 Brilliant Blue.
 
Perhaps the he most elegant Curacao is "Grand Marnier" usually served  neat as a digestive with coffee, some cocktails, or as an ingredient in cake.
 
Malibu Liqueurs 


ALC/VOL = 21% - 40% Alcohol
Curaçao is a liqueur flavoured with the dried peel of the laraha citrus fruit, grown on the island of Curaçao. A non-native plant similar to an orange, the laraha developed from the sweet Valencia orange transplanted by Spanish explorers. The nutrient-poor soil and arid climate of Curaçao proved unsuitable to Valencia cultivation, resulting in small, bitter fruit of the trees. Although the bitter flesh of the Laraha is all but inedible, the peels are aromatic and flavourful, maintaining much of the essence of the Valencia orange.

Curaçao liqueur was first developed and marketed by the Senior family in the 19th century. To create the liqueur the laraha peel is dried, bringing out the sweetly fragranced oils. After soaking in a still with alcohol and water for several days, the peel is removed and other spices are added.

The liqueur has an orange-like flavour with varying degrees of bitterness. It is naturally colourless, but is often given artificial colouring, most commonly blue or orange, which confers an exotic appearance to cocktails and other mixed drinks. Blue colour is achieved by adding of food colorant, most often E133 Brilliant Blue.
 
Perhaps the he most elegant Curacao is "Grand Marnier" usually served  neat as a digestive with coffee, some cocktails, or as an ingredient in cake.
 
Baileys Liqueurs 


ALC/VOL = 17%  Alcohol
Baileys Irish Cream is an Irish whiskey and cream based liqueur, made by Gilbey's of Ireland. The trademark is currently owned by Diageo. It has a declared alcohol content of 17% alcohol by volume.In 2005, Baileys launched mint chocolate and crème caramel variants of its Irish Cream at 17% ABV. They were originally released in UK airports and were subsequently released in the mass market of the UK, US, Australia and Canada in 2006. In 2008, Baileys, after the success of previous flavour variants, released a coffee variant of its Irish Cream with an ABV of 17%, followed by a Hazelnut flavoured variant in 2010. The company is currently trialling a new premium variety, Baileys Gold, at several European airports. The latest additions to the Baileys flavour family are Biscotti and Hazelnut, which were launched in 2011 and Baileys Chocolat Luxe in 2013. The company recently released a Vanilla-Cinnamon variety in the US market.

As of 2010, Baileys has its own line of non-alcoholic coffee creamers.

 

 
Curacao


ALC/VOL = 21% - 40% Alcohol
Curaçao is a liqueur flavoured with the dried peel of the laraha citrus fruit, grown on the island of Curaçao. A non-native plant similar to an orange, the laraha developed from the sweet Valencia orange transplanted by Spanish explorers. The nutrient-poor soil and arid climate of Curaçao proved unsuitable to Valencia cultivation, resulting in small, bitter fruit of the trees. Although the bitter flesh of the Laraha is all but inedible, the peels are aromatic and flavourful, maintaining much of the essence of the Valencia orange.

Curaçao liqueur was first developed and marketed by the Senior family in the 19th century. To create the liqueur the laraha peel is dried, bringing out the sweetly fragranced oils. After soaking in a still with alcohol and water for several days, the peel is removed and other spices are added.

The liqueur has an orange-like flavour with varying degrees of bitterness. It is naturally colourless, but is often given artificial colouring, most commonly blue or orange, which confers an exotic appearance to cocktails and other mixed drinks. Blue colour is achieved by adding of food colorant, most often E133 Brilliant Blue.
 
Perhaps the he most elegant Curacao is "Grand Marnier" usually served  neat as a digestive with coffee, some cocktails, or as an ingredient in cake.
 
Triple Sec 
ALC/VOL = 21%- 40% Alcohol
Triple sec, originally Curaçao triple sec, is a variety of Curaçao liqueur, an orange-flavoured liqueur made from the dried peels of bitter and sweet orange.

Triple sec may be consumed neat as a digestive or on the rocks, but is more likely to be used as an ingredient in a variety of cocktails such as the Margarita, White Lady, Long Island Iced Tea, and Cosmopolitan.

The Combier distillery claims that Triple sec was invented some time between 1834 and 1848 by Jean-Baptiste Combier in Saumur, France. However, Combier was more famous for its élixir Combier, which contained orange but also many other flavourings. Cointreau, which is a well respected and acclaimed Triple sec, was created in 1875.

Triple sec was certainly widely known by 1878; at the Exposition Universelle of 1878 in Paris.